1978, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota: Boater Sees Bigfoot Carvings

TODAY IN BIGFOOT HISTORY!

1978, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota: Boater Sees Bigfoot Carvings

Ed Zattara was canoeing in Voyageurs National Park. He noticed a large jutting rock structure ahead so he paddled toward it, thinking it would be a nice place to eat his brown bag lunch.

When he clambered up onto the rocks, Zattara noticed some very odd markings in the stones. He took out his notepad, the one he planned to use to note all the various birds he saw on his trip. He took a few minutes to trace out the crudely carved oddities.

Later, he showed his drawings to a friend of his, Mark Slocumb who was an expert in Native American stone carvings. When Slocumb looked the Zattara’s  markings, he grew very quiet and somewhat scared. He asked again where Zattara had seen them.

Growing alarmed, Zattara demanded answers. Slocumb slowly explained that he had only ever seen markings like this once before, at a very secret and remote location where a shaman had lead him blindfolded. The shaman said that these markings were made by Bigfoot to commemorate the dead. In other words, it was a Bigfoot gravestone that Zattara had eaten his peanut butter and jelly sandwich on.

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1949, Adler Creek, Sandy, Oregon: Charles McBride Witnesses a Bigfoot Funeral

TODAY IN BIGFOOT HISTORY!

1949, Adler Creek, Sandy, Oregon: Charles McBride Witnesses a Bigfoot Funeral

While fishing, Charles McBride saw a group of what looked like three bears walking upright move through the forest.  Leaving his kit behind, McBride followed the bear creatures.

After several stops, where the creatures leaned against trees and appeared to weep, the procession stopped at a particularally shallow spot in the river.  The three creatures waded into the Creek.  McBride, then, saw that two of the creatures were carrying a fourth creature.

Two of the Bigfoot washed their dead friend in the creek, smoothing out its fur.  Meanwhile, the third started digging a deep hole with his massive hands.  The three gently lowered the body of their friend into the grave and howled together.  McBride thought he heard a sad melody to the beast’s dirge.

All three Bigfoot filled in the hole.  The smallest of the three gathered up some smooth stones and little rocks, which were carefully arranged on the grave.  Once this ritual was completed, all three Bigfoot ran off in different directions.

Later when McBride tried to return to the grave site, he could not find the rocks nor any evidence of recent digging.  As a result, his story remains widely dismissed as the fantasy of a sun drunk fisherman.